PROTECTING OUR COMMUNITY

Berkeley prides itself on innovation, progressive politics, inclusivity and tolerance.

These values have defined Berkeley over the years, and are even more important at a time when the federal administration is sowing division, fear and suspicion.

 
  Photo courtesy of Mark Coplan

Photo courtesy of Mark Coplan

Sanctuary City

In January 2017, we reaffirmed our status as a sanctuary city, which means that no city staff, including police, will collaborate with federal immigration agents unless required by law.

Our city has a fundamental respect for diversity and human rights, and we are willing to do whatever is necessary to protect those tenets of our community.

Divestment

The City Council voted to divest President Trump’s border wall in spring 2017, becoming the first city in the United States to take such a stand. Since then, many cities, including Oakland and Richmond, have followed suit.

In addition, the city is taking steps to sever ties with Wells Fargo by May 2018, due to the bank's unethical practices and funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which threatens tribal water sources. 

  Photo courtesy of Mark Coplan

Photo courtesy of Mark Coplan

Public Safety 

The Berkeley Police Department patrols our city on foot, bicycle, motorcycle and car to make sure residents are safe. Our police frequently participate in community events, volunteer in the community and put on crime prevention presentations. In an era of heightened tensions between residents and police, we are working to bridge connections and build trust.

Public Health

Major disparities in health outcomes among Berkeley residents, lack of access to mental health services and the planned closure a beloved community hospital are all major issues facing our city. Mayor Arreguin has recently reconvened a regional health task force to study ways to keep Alta Bates open and ensure that all residents have access to medical treatment.