BUILDING OUR FUTURE >> ENVIRONMENT

Our commitment to the environment informs all of our policy making.

 

Climate change, pollution, drought, and environmental disparities are issues that affect us all, both locally and globally.

That's why this year, the Mayor and members of the City Council reaffirmed Berkeley’s participation in the Paris Global Climate Agreement

The goals of the international accords, signed by nearly 200 countries, are in line with Berkeley's Climate Action Plan (CAP), approved in 2009, that aims to achieve zero net energy consumption for all new and existing buildings by 2050. Other CAP goals include making public transit, walking and cycling the primary means of transportation, sending zero waste to landfills, and achieving net zero energy on all city buildings.

Berkeley recently joined the East Bay Community Energy Authority, which, for the first time ever, will give residents an alternative to PG&E and the chance to get 100 percent of their energy from renewable sources as early as mid-2018.

Berkeley was the first city in the country to allow homeowners to pay for solar power installation and energy efficient improvements as a voluntary long-term assessment on their property taxes.

Berkeley was the first city in the country to allow homeowners to pay for solar power installation and energy efficient improvements as a voluntary long-term assessment on their property taxes.

By 2018, Berkeley will be part of a 7,000 bike regional bike share network including Oakland, Emeryville, San Francisco and San Jose, and the Bay Area will have one of the largest and densest bike share systems in North America. 

By 2018, Berkeley will be part of a 7,000 bike regional bike share network including Oakland, Emeryville, San Francisco and San Jose, and the Bay Area will have one of the largest and densest bike share systems in North America. 

Reducing Carbon Emissions

One in ten Berkeley residents bike to work, the highest share of bike commuters of any city our size, and we're working to make biking even more accessible. 

In July 2017, Berkeley unveiled a new bike sharing system featuring 38 stations around town, and over 400 bikes.

Our bike stations will connect to a larger network, creating easier ways to get to BART, AC Transit, and other key destinations in Oakland and Emeryville.

Mayor Arreguin is also involved in developing the East Bay Greenway Concept Plan, that would create a bicycle and pedestrian pathway from Oakland to Hayward under the elevated BART tracks, as well as the Berkeley Bicycle Plan. 

Growing food locally is also a key component of reducing greenhouse gases, and Berkeley's Urban Agriculture Package, which the Mayor proposed while representing District 4, makes key updates to zoning laws to remove barriers to growing food in in the city.

Karl Linn Community Gardens is one of dozens of city-subsidized community gardens where residents can grow food.

Karl Linn Community Gardens is one of dozens of city-subsidized community gardens where residents can grow food.

Zero Waste Goals

Berkeley's Zero Waste Commission is developing ways to reduce how much waste goes to landfills, with the goal of eventually eliminating or diverting it altogether.

As of July 1, 2014, all businesses are required to have recycling collection for basic recyclable materials, and restaurants and markets are required to have organics collection for food scraps, food soiled paper and plant debris.

In addition, residential properties of over 5 units are required to provide recycling and organics collection for their tenants’ food scraps, food soiled papers and any plant debris generated at the property. Since 2013, the city has expanded its recycling program to accept all clean, rigid plastic containers.

For more information, check out Alameda County's guide to Recycling Rules.

Zero Net Energy Building

Building with zero net energy goals means working to ensure that the total amount of energy used by a building is about the same as the amount of renewable energy created by the building, and it's key to meeting our sustainability goals.

In 2016, the city voted to move ahead with the study of the Berkeley Deep Green Building Initiative.

The initiative's goal is to incorporate practices such as ultra-efficient construction and deep energy retrofit projects that consume only as much energy as they produce from clean, renewable resources.

The Deep Green Building Initiative builds on the work of our Climate Action Plan and the Berkeley Energy Savings Ordinance (BESO), creating an incentive-based program to move Berkeley buildings towards zero net energy, ahead of the state.