BUILDING OUR FUTURE >> HOMELESSNESS

An estimated 1,000 people, or 1 percent of the city’s entire population, are homeless.

 

According to a homeless count conducted in January 2017, an estimated 1,000 people, or 1 percent of the city’s entire population, are homeless. Since Mayor Arreguin's election in November, the city has taken bold steps to address this crisis. 

Within weeks of taking office, the Mayor worked with several other councilmembers to activate the regional Emergency Operations Center to address the winter shelter crisis.

The city was able to immediately double the number of shelter beds and warming centers available, providing life-saving shelter to hundreds of homeless individuals. The Mayor's office is now working to create a year-round short-term shelter, while developing measures to help people successfully transition to living on their own.


The Pathways Project

Central to the Mayor's plan for combating homelessness is The Pathways Project, which includes both short and long term measures to support our homeless population, and improve the conditions of Berkeley’s streets, parks and neighborhoods.

The Center for Stability, Navigation and Respite (STAIR) will offer short-term shelter to the homeless, and allow families, pets, and personal belongings. The center will also work to connect the homeless to permanent housing, family reunification, and eventually transition to a communal village providing long-term housing and support.  

City Council recently voted to earmark $400,000 for Pathways, and is also actively pursuing private funding.

Berkeley High School students prepare to serve homeless residents at the 2016 Berkeley High Holiday Meal.

Berkeley High School students prepare to serve homeless residents at the 2016 Berkeley High Holiday Meal.


The Homeless Outreach and Treatment Team (HOTT)

In June 2017, the city launched the Homeless Outreach and Treatment Team to target the two-pronged problem of mental health and homelessness.

This program, staffed by trained outreach workers, will contact homeless people with serious mental health issues and help them access crucial services with the hope of transitioning to permanent housing.

Clients will be selected based on a number of factors such as living with mental illness, suffering from addiction, frequent use of emergency rooms and problematic street behavior. The team will work together with The Hub, the city’s coordinated point of entry for housing and homeless services.

If you or someone you know needs assistance, contact The Hub at  1-866-960-2132 or by walk in at 1901 Fairview Street (at Adeline Street).


Berkeley Way Project

In June 2017, Council unanimously approved prioritizing the Berkeley Way project led by BRIDGE Housing and Berkeley Food and Housing Project in Downtown Berkeley. 

When completed, the project will consist of 142 permanent affordable housing units, along with emergency shelter and transitional housing for homeless veterans. This is the largest investment into housing the homeless and the working poor the city has ever made.

To make this project a reality, the Mayor and other councilmembers are working to leverage the city’s investment to obtain $17 million in state funds through the California Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities program.

Design plans for the Berkeley Way development. Photo courtesy of BRIDGE and Berkeley Food and Housing Project

Design plans for the Berkeley Way development.

Photo courtesy of BRIDGE and Berkeley Food and Housing Project